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Author Topic: A Necromancer's Parting Gift  (Read 5832 times)
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Etherdrifter
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« on: March 31, 2015, 10:55:46 AM »

Edward McGill attacks you with a heavy sword for 5 damage. You die.
Edward McGill stares at the lich's blood on his sword before smiling. "Have fun, lad. Is the only way to stay sane on this island, mate." He says before walking off.
You assume spirit form and leave your corpse behind.

Edward McGill looks around, suddenly afraid
Edward McGill falls to the ground as an unseen force slowly rips out his fingernails one by one...
Edward McGill screams again and again as each nail slowly twists away, his final cry of "I'm sorry!" echoing throughout the jungle as the presence leaves...

Necromancy, nature's way of saying "you shouldn't have done that".
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Grayson Hunt
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« Reply #1 on: March 31, 2015, 08:49:38 PM »

Necromancy: something Nature says you shouldn't do. What's dead should stay dead, ya crusty old corpse.

~Love ya, mate.
~Edward McGill
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A true outlaw finds the balance between the passion in his heart and the reason in his mind. The outcome is the balance of might and right.
Etherdrifter
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« Reply #2 on: April 01, 2015, 12:27:38 AM »

That is not dead which can eternal lie,
And with strange aeons even death may die.
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Swarm
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« Reply #3 on: April 01, 2015, 01:02:11 AM »

Swarm scratches his head
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Neil Tathers
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« Reply #4 on: April 01, 2015, 01:46:16 AM »

I tried that death thing, didn't last longer than a year I think.
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Swarm
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« Reply #5 on: April 01, 2015, 02:11:34 AM »

Normal humans can't simply get bored of death.  I guess we're not all Neil
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Grayson Hunt
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« Reply #6 on: April 01, 2015, 02:13:43 AM »

That is not dead which can eternal lie,
And with strange aeons even death may die.
*quirks an eyebrow in confusion*
Mate, yer best hand at poetry, t'ain't that great.

~Edward McGill
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A true outlaw finds the balance between the passion in his heart and the reason in his mind. The outcome is the balance of might and right.
Killian
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« Reply #7 on: April 01, 2015, 09:48:48 PM »

Oh, Lovecraft huh? Been a while since I've heard him referenced.

Borges' reputation went farther than Lovecraft's because he was self-aware enough to cast away the puerile drive for superiority as he aged. This broadened his horizons and expanded his reader base without thinning the quality of his narrative. Maybe Yog Sothoth never gave that New Englishman enough time for his chance, but within his middle aged lifetime, Lovecraft never stopped being racist, and it is doubtful he ever would have, while Borges was embarrassed by his ultra-nationalist upbringing at age 22.

Towards his final days, Borges gradually showed his mortality by revealing he had never actually read the notoriously massive and difficult novel, Ulysses, cover to cover (instead having read a half-as-long guidebook), a feat that originally gave him massive lit-peen in his scholarly circles. Perhaps Etherdrifter may one day admit that he is, in fact, not an immortal lich, who is not unfathomably mysterious and powerful.

Even if Lovecraft's prose-poetry was worse than Poe's (a difficult feat when one considers Wilde's incisive views on poetry), on the plus side, it offered Borges a style to borrow and enhance from, in his typical fabulist manner. Perhaps liches are not all bad, even if they never die, despite saying they've departed a gajillion years ago.
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gridflay
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« Reply #8 on: April 02, 2015, 02:40:27 PM »

Oh come now, Lovecraft was a bit of a headcase; between his hypochondria and his late success, his window of productivity was pretty narrow. Not that Borges wasn't better, mind you, just that I'm not sure it's really a fair comparison (and admittedly, HPL's racism was pretty ugly). Still, Lovecraft's work was often clever, and his prolific correspondence with other writers contains some great ideas (that Derleth, a lesser writer still, would borrow).

Also, yay necromancy! Iai! Iai!
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Killian
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« Reply #9 on: April 03, 2015, 05:55:15 AM »

Fair point. They dealt with similar vast themes, during a time startling truths about the world were backed up by logical rigor, and are among the few notables who embedded them in literature during that period, so I consider them two sides of a same coin (or something more foldable than a coin). I prefer Wandrei to Lovecraft, as he was a better narrator than Lovecraft, even if he wasn't the prince Weird Tales rallied around.

Yeah, necromancy's the . Ready Player One (an entertaining but trashy novel) claimed that there are countless examples of liches in fiction, but really there's barely two dozen ones that are half-decent or better. They're awesome archetypes, and are a form that realist fiction sorely lacks.
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gridflay
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« Reply #10 on: April 03, 2015, 02:28:43 PM »

Or go backward, even, to HPL's roots. Lord Dunsany was a hoot, and Robert Chambers was... creepy.
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FirstAmongstDaves
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« Reply #11 on: January 04, 2016, 02:48:44 AM »

I read in a book by Warren Ellis that Dick Giordano, an editor at DC Comics, had met Lovecraft. English writer and aspiring sorcerer Alan Moore asked Giordano what Lovecraft was like. Giordano said something like, "Yeah, I thought at the time that I should remember just in case Alan :palm:ing Moore asked me one day." Classy stuff.
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« Reply #12 on: October 10, 2016, 08:02:15 AM »

Oh, hello there, master Etherdrifter.
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Dunjk, barbarian and occultist from Dalpok.

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« Reply #13 on: October 11, 2016, 03:54:02 AM »

I read in a book by Warren Ellis that Dick Giordano, an editor at DC Comics, had met Lovecraft. English writer and aspiring sorcerer Alan Moore asked Giordano what Lovecraft was like. Giordano said something like, "Yeah, I thought at the time that I should remember just in case Alan :palm:ing Moore asked me one day." Classy stuff.

Har!! Aye liked that me own self. Bite me Alan Moore! Ye deserved that! Can Ye ink like this? 'e made even Ernie Chua look good!



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